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✨!LIGHT THE NIGHT TIME! ✨

As many of you know, our clinic does fundraising for the The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society​ via Light the Night in Saskatoon. Every year we have tried to do a little more, and last year we were able to raise over $1000 for Light the Night!

Haylie’s Story:
Another year has come and gone! Back to fundraising for Light the Night for 2018, and although many people know why I have chosen Light the Night as my fundraiser I want to share my story.

My dad, Hank, was diagnosed with CLL when I was in school. This type of LEUKEMIA, unlike others, is a type where treatment in the beginning is to “do nothing”. Over the next 10 years or so, dad went through a variety of monitoring, chemotherapies and appointments. February 2012 he received a stem cell transplant – his brother Stephan was a perfect match. The transplant was successful and although he was dealing with some graft versus host, he was in excellent shape compared to some. Tragically, my uncle Stephan passed away in June 2012 from a heart attack, despite multiple cardiovascular stress tests undertaken to be fit to be a donor. Unfortunately in 2016 during routine scans, further cancer was found – CLL again, just slightly different “mutation” from the last one. He has been doing well, and thanks to many drug advancements has been effectively treated to date.

had the drugs that are available now, been available when dad was going through stem cell transplant, he likely wouldn’t have needed the transplant in the first place!

Because of treatment options available to him my dad was able to:
*See me graduate from University, and get a job in my chosen profession
*Watch me get engaged 
*Helped me move into my first home 
*Attend my wedding and walk me down the aisle 
*Welcomed two grandchildren (and a grand-dog!) 
*Helped and supported me open my own business 
*Been present for countless events, big and small and celebrate with our family and friends 

In discussion regarding some of the treatment options, we were told that had the drugs that are available now, been available when dad was going through stem cell transplant, he likely wouldn’t have needed the transplant in the first place! I believe that this cause, raising money for research and to help support families is a huge part of progressing treatment options and ensuring that we can get the best outcomes for our family members, coworkers, and friends that are diagnosed with blood cancers.
~Haylie

What are we doing at the clinic THIS YEAR and how can YOU help?

*We are kicking off this year with a FUNdraising FUN RUN & BBQ on June 3! We have multiple distances for people to run, jog, or walk (2km, 5km, 10km) with 100% of proceeds going to Light the Night! Not only do we have a run happening, we will also be doing a BBQ at the Warman Co-op!

Stay tuned throughout the summer and fall to find out more ways you can participate in our FUNdraising this year!

 

 

March was Endometriosis Awareness month, and we have provided some information related to endo for everyone on our social media (Facebook and Instagram). If you are wondering what endometriosis looks like for someone living with it, you can check out the story we posted earlier in the month. As promised here are some of the things that Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy can do for you…

Pain Science

Physiotherapists that work with pelvic pain conditions, such as endometriosis, have additional training specific to the actual science behind pain. Having this knowledge to give to our clients allows us to de-mystify pain, help us understand pain perception, and why the symptoms are occurring. Globally with pain science, one of the most important things to understand are there are no pain signals to the brain. The brain receives information from the body, and depending on what all those signals are saying, will determine if something is painful or not. Have you ever stubbed your toe when you are having a great day? It hurts SO MUCH. But, if you stub your toe while you are in the middle of an argument with someone, it doesn’t hurt the same; that’s pain science!

Everyone has heard a story of someone being in an accident of some kind and being able to get to a hospital (or civilization) before feeling pain.

How does this apply to endo? Endometriosis is the presence of uterine-like tissue outside of the uterus, within the pelvic bowl and abdomen (generally). Endometrial tissue contracts during menses to shed the lining of the uterine wall. If this tissue is outside of the uterus… it still contracts on the tissue it is adhered to.

Which brings us to….

Assist muscle tension

If you have a muscle that is contracting and creating more tension over time, and you aren’t stretching it, eventually it becomes tighter. Have you tried stretching tight muscles? How about making them contract more?

Here is where we talk about what happens in a painful body – when we have abdominal and pelvic pain, we try and protect the area. This protection leads us to adopt a fetal position. Tightness develops in the abdominals, hip flexors, pelvic floor, and diaphragm, which plays into the pain cycle. Pelvic floor physiotherapists will work with each woman to obtain appropriate length, strength, and coordination of the muscles in the abdomen and pelvic bowl.

Tight muscles are often painful muscles.

Provide self-assistance tools

We are here to help you, help yourself. Giving you tools to reduce pain for between episodes, things to try during painful episodes, and ultimately manage your pain.

Some things that could be helpful include: stretching your hip flexors, deep breathing, yoga, meditation, using a wheat bag, and releasing muscles using an acupressure ball (or tennis ball).

 

Endometriosis can’t be cured by physiotherapy, but the symptoms can be managed. Contact us today to see how we can help you, or use the Book Now section to schedule your assessment today, and take control.

*Note: Kendra Usunier is our Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist that is able to take new clients at this time. Only clients that have seen Haylie Lashta previously are to schedule in with her at this time. We appreciate each person and their unique journey to find us, contact us directly should you have any questions.

Haylie has been practicing women’s health and focused in prenatal and post-partum care since graduating from the U of S MPT program in 2011. Advocating for treatment for women, ensuring appropriate and effective care throughout pregnancy and post-partum, and helping all expecting and post-partum moms brought her to open her family-friendly clinic; where clients are encouraged to bring their infants and children to treatment. Warman Physiotherapy & Wellness has been nominated for the 2016 WMBEXA and ABEX Awards, is a WMBEXA award recipient of 2017, and Haylie was recognized as YWCA Women of Distinction for Health & Wellness in 2017.

Q: How do I know if I should see someone?

A: There are many different signs or symptoms that women can watch for to know if they should be seeing a pelvic floor therapist. Some of the big things to think about include:

  • leaking (urine or feces)
  • urgency and frequency (many trips to the bathroom, or getting to the bathroom and voiding small amounts)
  • pain with intercourse
  • pressure in the pelvic floor
  • feeling like things are falling down or falling out
  • needing to ‘lift’ the pelvic floor or ‘help down there’ to void the bladder or evacuate the bowel
  • inability to increase activity due to any symptoms
  • low back, pubic symphysis, hip or SIJ pain
  • recurring tightness of the hips and pelvis
  • you have been pregnant
  • you have delivered a baby (vaginally or via c-section)

… and this isn’t necessarily an exhaustive list, just the first things that come to mind for clientele that frequent the clinic. Essentially if you feel there is something that is ‘off’ or ‘wrong’ within the pelvic floor, abdomen or pelvis, seeing a pelvic floor therapist may be of benefit.

 

Q: Do you recommend that all women see a pelvic floor physio? Or just if they are “leaking”?

A: There are a great many symptoms

 

that can be indicating factors for pelvic floor dysfunction that doesn’t have anything to do with leaking in particular. To answer this question in short: yes. In long, I would say that many women would benefit from a pelvic floor assessment regardless of their “leaking” status, especially for women who have had children, or anyone who experiences pain with intercourse.

 

A big reason for the general answer of “yes” is the fact that what we know about pelvic floor is not necessarily functional working knowledge. Rather, most women ‘know’ they are supposed to do ‘kegels’, and yet no one has taken the time to explain or ensure that they are being done correctly. What we know about kegels is that they are meant to strengthen the pelvic floor, and most women describe that they imagine SQUEEZING the pelvic floor. As my clients know, the pelvic floor to work functionally needs to LIFT UP and IN, not squeeze, as well as RELAX down and out.

 

 

 

 

Just because you aren’t leaking, doesn’t necessarily mean that the pelvic floor is functioning well. Just the same as even though many people do not have knee pain, they often have weakness or tightness that could be addressed to prevent issues arising in the future.

 

Q: When do you recommend women be seen? During pregnancy? Post-partum?

A: Women can and should be seen whenever they are having issues. Issues are bound to arise during pregnancy and post-partum. So long as there aren’t any contraindications to a pelvic floor exam by the treating physician or OB assessment during pregnancy is possible as well (after the first trimester). During pregnancy some women will choose to attend an assessment for labor and delivery preparation after 32 weeks gestation to help get a better handle on relaxing the pelvic floor; we do want a baby to come down and out after all!

Post-partum we are able to see women that are painful as soon as they feel up for leaving the house, and specific for pelvic floor assessment approximately 6-8 weeks post-partum. Pelvic Floor

 

Therapy is able to address c-section healing and recovery, as well as perineal healing and recovery. Tearing, surgical incisions, other birth traumas can all be addressed in the post-partum phase.

Q: What if I haven’t had children in a few years but am experiencing problems? Can physio still help?

A: YES YES YES! The absolute best thing about the body is it’s propensity to change. It is never too late to see a pelvic floor physio, 8 weeks, 8months, 8 years or longer we can always see what changes can be made to help resolve any complaint

Q: What are some signs of a weak pelvic floor?

A: The simple answer for this one is leaking or incontinence. The long answer is – it depends on whether it is loose and weak (not very common) or tight and weak (much more common). Often we equate something being tight or taught with being strong, but this is definitely not the case with the pelvic floor. A tight but weak pelvic floor often progresses through one or a combination of: discomfort or pain with intercourse, constipation or difficulty completely emptying the bowels, discomfort or bruised feeling through the perineum or tail bone, hip tightness and restricted movement, low back pain… and more. One client had neck pain (right by the shoulders) that she had had since her second was born (5 years previous) and nothing seemed to help. Ultimately this client had pelvic floor weakness that was driving her neck pain!

Do you know someone having issues with this area? Maybe they have some of the complaints listed above – share with them! Are YOU someone suffering with these symptoms? Contact us today to get started your path to resolution!

Do you have some BURNING questions you want answered that wasn’t covered? Send them our way and we will get them going in Part 2!

Haylie has been practicing women’s health and focused in prenatal and post-partum care since graduating from the U of S MPT program in 2011. Advocating for treatment for women, ensuring appropriate and effective care throughout pregnancy and post-partum, and helping all expecting and post-partum moms brought her to open her family-friendly clinic; where clients are encouraged to bring their infants and children to treatment. Warman Physiotherapy & Wellness has been nominated for the 2016 WMBEXA and ABEX Awards, is a WMBEXA award recipient of 2017, and Haylie was recognized as YWCA Women of Distinction for Health & Wellness in 2017.

It seems the topic of “Diastasis” is picking up speed in a variety of forums. Particularly on social media in mom groups and exercise discussions. There also appears to be a wide array of misinformation that continues to be spread around. I had one client tell me “I have been doing some research and one place I went to online said that if I have a diastasis I will ALWAYS look a minimum of 3 months pregnant.” This, for the vast majority, doesn’t necessarily need to be true; especially when you know what to do. I have been asked to write a few key things in regards to diastasis from a physiotherapy rehabilitation perspective.

…if I have a diastasis I will ALWAYS look 3 months pregnant

Let’s discuss what a diastasis is. The short version is it is the ‘splitting of the abdominal muscles’. A more specific answer is that in response to pregnancy, the abdominal muscles and associated tissue (fascia) stretch to allow room for a growing fetus. The muscles that are most affected by this is the rectus abdominis (the 6-pack ab muscles that sit in the front). This is not ‘bad’, cannot be prevented, and is in fact necessary during pregnancy. From a clinical perspective, I would say 100% of women who are pregnant, that look pregnant at the time of delivery, will have developed some diastasis during pregnancy. (Side note: diastasis  can also occur outside of pregnancy, but that is another discussion.)

In theory, after labor and delivery, the diastasis will ‘snap’ back together and the core muscles will work in perfect unison… Sometimes this coordination comes naturally to women post-partum. However, often women require some help in getting all the pieces working well together in a functional and coordinated fashion.

…after labor and delivery, the diastasis will ‘snap’ back together 

This is where people profit off our post-partum mommas  “Get your body BACK after baby”, “Post-partum BOOTCAMP”, “Get rid of MUMMY TUMMY in 1 simple exercise”. Unless someone is checking for diastasis recti, do so on a regular (weekly, daily) basis, and can ensure that you are coordinating those muscles well… claiming to be a Post-Partum Specialist is likely an over statement. Often times I see that someone has “healed” their own diastasis and want to “show you how” with their main credential being that they went through the same thing, and they are fine after starting back into heavy exercise at “6” weeks post-partum.

Simply asking people if they have a diastasis is not enough. Knowledge of the issue without being able to assist in modifying exercises to appropriately return to function is where many people stand. Are you wanting to start a class? Ask the instructor what they know about diastasis. If you don’t know if you have one, will they check? How many people have they checked? If they are claiming that their class is ‘safe’ for diastasis and you are being targeted to come under 12 weeks, you would likely benefit from continuing to evaluate your options.

A diastasis is not necessarily a ‘quick fix’, and often people don’t realize they have it since it typically isn’t painful. What we do KNOW is that a diastasis present at 8 weeks post-partum is likely to continue to be present and problematic at a year post-partum. But what does ‘problematic’ mean if it’s not painful?

The tissue (fascia) of the diastasis doesn’t need to close in the sense of getting back to how it was, but it does need to be able to generate tension. If it can generate tension well and it is separated 2.5cm that person is going to have better function than if it is separated 1.5cm and not generating tension. (Think of tension as whether you have a firm uncooked noodle versus a soft, cooked noodle between the muscles. The cooked noodle will give away under pressure of the muscles on either side, and the uncooked noodle will hold and transfer force). Problematic could also be the contribution of diastasis to back pain, diaphragm dysfunction, and pelvic floor issues.

Focusing on the diastasis alone is a simplification of a complex situation, and each person will require slightly different treatment approaches.

What do I recommend? Contact your local pelvic floor physiotherapist, there is no time limit on when to go, but within the first 8-12 weeks will give time to get into a routine with baby and be early enough to have minimal “bad habits” or compensations to combat; or before you start back into exercise. It  is never too late to address anything that has developed during pregnancy and post-partum.

We are totally blown away! This year seems to be a total whirlwind of activity, nominations and growth for us at the clinic.

The Warman and Martensville Chambers of Commerce presented the second annual WMBEXA, and we were thrilled to be nominated in several categories. Only able to apply for two we were floored to be a finalist in Customer Service and New Business announced March 2017. Since the announcement of finalists for WMBEXA, Haylie was also revealed as a nominee for the YWCA Women of Distinction Awards for Health & Wellness, we announced the arrival of physiotherapist Kendra Usunier to begin work as of May 23, 2017, and we also had the pleasure of welcoming a student, Jill, for her first clinical placement in the MPT program through April and the first week in May.

May 5, 2017 was the WMBEXA event and it was spectacular! Many exceptional local businesses were finalists, many more had been nominated in 5 categories, and dozens of other businesses were a part of the event to network and enjoy the event.

Much to our shock and amazement, Warman Physiotherapy & Wellness was awarded the best New Business of 2017!

    

“I was thrilled to be a finalist in the company of 4 other amazing businesses. It seems that I although I have no problem talking for hours on end about the pelvic floor and all things physio, I have difficulty standing up for a 2 minute acceptance speech!

This clinic has been a vision of mine since I was in the school for Physical Therapy and I am so fortunate to have been able to make my dream a reality. This dream coming true would not be possible without the support of my family. My parents for being supportive and providing assistance whenever needed. My wonderful amazing and supportive family; my husband, Rob, for allowing me to work days, nights and weekends; often 60+ hours a week, as well as being our resident clinic ‘handy man’. My 3 year old daughter Emily for coming to the clinic ‘to do work stuff’ and dance with the skeleton when I’m sneaking in a client in need on a day off. THANK YOU.

I must thank my wonderful therapists and our support staff. They have been an integral part of the success of the clinic, and have fully embraced my business vision. It is common to see and hear crying babies and children at the clinic since we see so many women who are pregnant and post-partum, we feel providing care is most important, regardless of the ability to find childcare. THANK YOU.

There is no doubt that without the support of the community and our wonderful clients – past, present, and future – we would not be where we are today. Our success in our business journey would not be possible without you. THANK YOU.”

Helping you, help yourself. From infancy to old age.