March was Endometriosis Awareness month, and we have provided some information related to endo for everyone on our social media (Facebook and Instagram). If you are wondering what endometriosis looks like for someone living with it, you can check out the story we posted earlier in the month. As promised here are some of the things that Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy can do for you…

Pain Science

Physiotherapists that work with pelvic pain conditions, such as endometriosis, have additional training specific to the actual science behind pain. Having this knowledge to give to our clients allows us to de-mystify pain, help us understand pain perception, and why the symptoms are occurring. Globally with pain science, one of the most important things to understand are there are no pain signals to the brain. The brain receives information from the body, and depending on what all those signals are saying, will determine if something is painful or not. Have you ever stubbed your toe when you are having a great day? It hurts SO MUCH. But, if you stub your toe while you are in the middle of an argument with someone, it doesn’t hurt the same; that’s pain science!

Everyone has heard a story of someone being in an accident of some kind and being able to get to a hospital (or civilization) before feeling pain.

How does this apply to endo? Endometriosis is the presence of uterine-like tissue outside of the uterus, within the pelvic bowl and abdomen (generally). Endometrial tissue contracts during menses to shed the lining of the uterine wall. If this tissue is outside of the uterus… it still contracts on the tissue it is adhered to.

Which brings us to….

Assist muscle tension

If you have a muscle that is contracting and creating more tension over time, and you aren’t stretching it, eventually it becomes tighter. Have you tried stretching tight muscles? How about making them contract more?

Here is where we talk about what happens in a painful body – when we have abdominal and pelvic pain, we try and protect the area. This protection leads us to adopt a fetal position. Tightness develops in the abdominals, hip flexors, pelvic floor, and diaphragm, which plays into the pain cycle. Pelvic floor physiotherapists will work with each woman to obtain appropriate length, strength, and coordination of the muscles in the abdomen and pelvic bowl.

Tight muscles are often painful muscles.

Provide self-assistance tools

We are here to help you, help yourself. Giving you tools to reduce pain for between episodes, things to try during painful episodes, and ultimately manage your pain.

Some things that could be helpful include: stretching your hip flexors, deep breathing, yoga, meditation, using a wheat bag, and releasing muscles using an acupressure ball (or tennis ball).

 

Endometriosis can’t be cured by physiotherapy, but the symptoms can be managed. Contact us today to see how we can help you, or use the Book Now section to schedule your assessment today, and take control.

*Note: Kendra Usunier is our Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist that is able to take new clients at this time. Only clients that have seen Haylie Lashta previously are to schedule in with her at this time. We appreciate each person and their unique journey to find us, contact us directly should you have any questions.

Haylie has been practicing women’s health and focused in prenatal and post-partum care since graduating from the U of S MPT program in 2011. Advocating for treatment for women, ensuring appropriate and effective care throughout pregnancy and post-partum, and helping all expecting and post-partum moms brought her to open her family-friendly clinic; where clients are encouraged to bring their infants and children to treatment. Warman Physiotherapy & Wellness has been nominated for the 2016 WMBEXA and ABEX Awards, is a WMBEXA award recipient of 2017, and Haylie was recognized as YWCA Women of Distinction for Health & Wellness in 2017.

I am a UK based physio working in Exeter and Totnes. My focus is in helping people to develop a positive relationship with their body allowing them to become injury free, taking control of their own health and enjoying an active life.

When learning new choreography there is often a pressure to get the moves right quickly. This can energise us and enables us to focus our effort but it can also increase stress and tension. By focusing on what we’re trying to achieve it’s easy to forget our bodies, the very thing we need to be tuned in to. In my experience as a physiotherapist, tension is the major risk factor in triggering an injury.

How can I stay relaxed when learning choreography?

As a physiotherapist I work closely with breath. When we are stressed it is easy to lose our natural breathing pattern. This results in breathing into the chest rather than using our full abdomen, increasing tension and reducing performance.

Instead, take opportunities to breathe in softly through the nose feeling the lower abdomen gently expand. Avoid pulling in or tensing the stomach muscles. If you sense tension or discomfort you can take a long, slow and gentle out breath exhaling through the nose. Feel the muscle tension melting away, you can focus relaxation on specific parts of your body.

Dancing is fun and it is important to not be hard on yourself but to treat your body with patience. Often my clients put a lot of pressure on themselves and find that their performance improves when they just relax into their practice. Trust that you’re doing your best and your body will follow. If you have an injury it can be both stressful and frustrating, you may feel unable to train and this stress is likely to slow down recovery. I encourage clients to use imagery in their recovery process, softening breath and imagining yourself doing the choreography. Imagery has been shown to improve sports performance and helps connect the body and mind.

Michael Otto BSc MCSP  Holistic Physio in the UK.

As many of you know I, Haylie Lashta, will be going on maternity leave soon, with my last day scheduling clients being June 2, 2017. I have searched for the perfect person to come in to cover for my maternity leave that can also complete women’s health assessment and treatment, and she has been found!

Kendra Usunier BMR(PT), MClSc, FCAMPT will be joining our team starting on May 23, 2017!

Biography

Kendra graduated from the University of Manitoba in 2008 with a Bachelors of Medical Rehabilitation in Physiotherapy. She went on to complete a Masters of Clinical Science in Manipulative Therapy from Western University in 2015.

Since graduating Kendra has worked in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. She returned to Saskatoon in 2012, and is excited to begin working in Warman. Having grown up in a smaller community, she is happy to return to that environment.

Kendra’s primary focus has been orthopaedics and women’s health. She has taken extensive additional training in orthopaedics, becoming a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy (FCAMPT) – an internationally recognized qualification in manual and manipulative therapy. For more information on CAMPT therapists please click here.

In addition to orthopaedics, Kendra has a passion for women’s health and pre-and post-natal care. She has also taken additional courses in treatment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction, acupuncture, pain management, and myofascial release.

Kendra has a passion for ongoing education in physiotherapy, striving to provide the most up to date, evidence based treatment for patients. She assists in instructing muskuloskeletal courses at the University of Saskatchewan and within the Canadian Orthopaedic Division Syllabus.

Kendra enjoys spending time with her husband and daughter, running, playing soccer and doing yoga in her spare time.

Areas of Practice Interest:

  • Spinal Assessment & Treatment
  • Osteoporosis Management
  • TMJ Dysfunction
  • Sports Rehabilitation
  • General Orthopedics
  • Prenatal & Post-partum
  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Pelvic Pain
  • Acupuncture

Kendra’s schedule has been provided and is available for appointments. Contact us to book your appointment today! Don’t want to wait? Cole Digel has availability as early as the week of May 15, 2017.

Case Study: A client HD came to the clinic after several weeks of shoulder, shoulder blade and arm pain. This pain started in the shoulder and moved down the arm. The client would describe the pain as ‘sharp’, ‘burning’, ‘shooting’, ‘deep achy’, and ‘pins and needles’ depending on what they did. Initially their pain would come and go, but over time the pain would stay for longer periods of time. This client found that sometimes anti-inflammatory medication and massage helped, but it always came back. Since their pain started in their shoulder it was believed that it was a shoulder injury (rotator cuff). After assessment by a physiotherapist it was identified that HD had issues from the neck resulting in shoulder and arm pain. With treatment including home exercises, stretches and programming, the client was able to return to full function and a pain-free state of being!

neck-pain

The story of HD is not uncommon. Often people are not sure where to go for a variety of issues and complaints. Your local Warman Physio is able to provide assessment and treatment of any ache or pain occurring within the body, whether it was caused by an injury or ‘just showed up’ one day.

Physiotherapists are trained to provide assessment and treatment of all the body systems including the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nervous system to identify what is causing any pain or issue.

Following is a list of conditions that Physiotherapists can help with in the neck and arm:

  • Disc bulges in the neck
    • often causes pain as is outlined in the image above with the red highlighted areas depending on the level the bulge is present
  • Nerve compression or irritation of nerves of the neck
    • pain down the arm with moving the head a particular direction like in shoulder checking
  • Carpal Tunnel syndrome
    • pain and tingling in the hand often upon waking from a night’s sleep to start
  • Rotator cuff injuries
    • pain in the shoulder often with reaching over head or behind the body
  • Tennis/Golfer’s elbow
    • pain on the outside/inside of the elbow often with lifting/carrying

 

How does the neck cause pain in the shoulder and arm?

The body is a complicated group of systems that work together to allow us to complete our everyday tasks. Our neck has 7 vertebra (C1-C7) that go from the base of the head to the base of the neck. Within your neck there are 2 joints at the top and bottom of each vertebra, and most of them are separated by small discs. Our spinal cord is enclosed inside a tunnel within the vertebra. The nerves that go down into the shoulder and arm come out from between the vertebra, through the muscles and down the arm. These nerves then control the muscles (creating movement) as well as sensation (touch, temperature, etc). If something happens to the nerve throughout it’s path down into the arm it can create issues in the movement, sensation, or both!Sometimes it is hard to figure out where pain is coming from – the muscles, joints, nerves, tendons (attach muscle to bone) or ligaments (attach bone to bone). Leave the guess work out of your pain and have it assessed by your local Warman Physio! We currently have appointments within 0-2 business days and have accommodating hours for early morning (8 am) and after work (until 8).